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Print Ads

Sep 26 2011

Check out these two posters I made, to advertise printing! I’m hoping to help the freshmen, I’m currently working on some “Printing Cheat Sheets” that can sit in the Dropbox and they can refer to, until they get it down-pat. Teaching the freshmen is win-win; it means that I get properly formatted files, and they learn how to do it right.

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inspiration

Sep 25 2011

One per week. Every Saturday.
If these people can make things of beauty, maybe so can I.

tag: graphic art



via: butdoesitfloat

tag: fun and games



via: core77

tag: familiar architecture



via: archdaily

tag: architecture sculpture art



via: Swiss Miss

tag: architecture art



via: \\\

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Contention Over Architecture

Sep 21 2011

I had a conversation earlier this morning about how interesting things like “grease trucks” are, because of they are completely mobile in nature and yet very important because of their ability to feed huge amounts of students. This led into talking about e-companies like Megabus. These in turn, are interesting because they operate without any physical infrastructure to speak of. Basically, if one of these companies went belly-up tomorrow, there would be almost no physical evidence of their existence.

Architecture used to represent a codification of power, the physical permanence of the built object would attest to the strength and permanence of the patron institution.

Now, in an era where banking mega-corporations can declare bankruptcy and disappear; leaving behind skyscrapers that must then be claimed by another company (for example, Johnson’s famous AT&T Tower becoming the Sony Building), Architecture really doesn’t imply the sort of powerful permanence that it used to.

And yet, built-work can still evoke… something. There is a group of protesters occupying Wall Street in NYC right at this very moment, and look what their Architecture led to:

This group is near and dear to my heart, because I believe strongly in civil disobedience. I’ll write more about them as opportunities arise.

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Fixing Things

Sep 21 2011

As a designer, and as a person, nothing pleases me more then to find something broken and fix it, ideally, while benefiting myself in the process.

In part, that is why I bought a plotter, because the current system for printing at NJIT sucks. The “show up during limited hours and get over-charged for printing, which you MUST do to pass studio” paradigm is so incredibly rotten and inefficient that it was ripe for redesign. With my services, people can print almost 24/7, at a more reasonable price. And once I finish the new upload form (this weekend!) they will be able to upload online, check the queue online, and receive instant information about the status of their print, also ONLINE. Which means less work for me and mine, and better service for everyone else.

Another thing that I think is really broken, that I want to fix is the lack of critical discussion of buildings. Architecture theory is pretty hard to find online, or it has been for me at least. Generally, Architecture is only presented as glossy photos and a press release, which leaves me wanting more.. Over the next year, I want to work to get this blog to the top of google’s search results when you look for “Architecture Theory Blog”, so that interested parties can find some critical discussion.

And hey, maybe it’ll even benefit me in the process.

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inspiration

Sep 18 2011

One per week. Every Saturday.
If these people can make things of beauty, maybe so can I.

tag: graphic-tool



via: alexhogrefe

tag: steampunk industrial design



via: core77

tag: caligraphy sculpture art



via: iainclaridge.net

tag: photography art



via: butdoesitfloat

tag: architecture sculpture art



via: Archdaily

tag: life-tool



via: Swiss Miss

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inspiration

Sep 11 2011

One per week. Every Saturday.
If these people can make things of beauty, maybe so can I.

tag:body art



via:\\\

tag: landscape architecture



via: designboom

tag: sculpture art



via:designboom

tag: graphic art



via iainclaridge.net

tag: cleverness



via Swiss Miss

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Intentions

Sep 06 2011

This semester is going to be an exploration of the theory behind field conditions, the manipulation of the ordinary, and the organization and representation of data-driven Architecture.
I’m really excited to improve my graphics ability too.
Let the semester.. Begin!

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What the Food

Sep 02 2011

Like everyone, I took a few pictures of the stuff I was eating.. A lot of the food, I actually made myself, but the ingredients were so fresh and it was so tasty that it was worth capturing.




Investigating my cafe… The cheese is so fresh and perfectly salty.. delicious.




After a long day, the best way to get a big meal is at the bar. Its called appertivo, and for five euro you get a drink (Cosmopolitan pictured) plus all you can eat of whatever they’re serving.




I ate a lot of gellato while in Italy. A. Lot. Of. Gellato.




If I had room in my bag, I would have bought one of these… they retail for about 30 euro.






The first of these two shows the caprese I got in Pienza, which was absolutely stellar. It was a good discovery on a side street, the only place that wasn’t totally packed.
The second image is my imitation in Siena, not quite as good, but still delicious.






Another “Matthew see, Matthew do”. this time with tagliare pasta and seafood. I used zucchini for mine because it was cheaper, in season, and I wanted to learn to prepare it.






These are my absolute favorites. Alec and I had this running experiment, anytime that we went out mapping, we’d find something to pick and try. Sometimes it was fresh peaches, other times it was black berries, and one (very unfortunate) time, it was blueberries (which tasted like chalk).




The only part of Firenze that I really liked was the place we grabbed lunch, everything came in a bread bowl and they had some great wine.




And finally, once I was in Berlin, I kept cooking, this is one of the meals I whipped up for myself. I love cooking, its almost as soothing as eating.

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Confused? Good, that is step one of mapping.

Aug 29 2011

Final Workshop:
After a lot of traveling it was nice to be able to somewhat settle into one location for a decent amount of time. For us this location was the city of Siena within Tuscany which we came to love and appreciate. Our final workshop was focused on a critical examination of the Sienese Urban condition, both within and beyond the walls. Through mapping and analysis we came to understand that a lot of Siena’s future relies on its ability to expand outside of the walls. With that in mind our goal became determining how it can grow in a way that is both intelligent and sustainable.

We we’re able to compile a final proposal that is comprised of three main components: Mapping, Proposals, and the Performance. The combination of all three gives a cohesive understanding of our view of Siena and its possible future. Through our rigorous mapping we were able to understand not only the past and present of the city but it’s potential for a future especially outside of its walls. This mapping was packaged into a proposal of changes as well as additions extending beyond the walls. Through our performance we were expressing the city now, which lead to the proposals of why exactly changes and additions were necessary for the cities growth. It is through the combination of all three elements that we were able to produce and comprehensive proposal which looks to guide Siena as it further expands outside the limits of its city wall.

Mapping
The most important component of the final workshop was the collective mapping done amongst all four of us which allowed for our proposals to be created. Mapping was done throughout the whole workshop and is something that is done in parallel with design. In essence mapping can never really be finished but continuously adds to the project. Each one of us took different findings out of each time we went mapping and allowed us to provide multiple points of views as well as direction for the proposal.

Without the mapping the proposals would have never been possible. It took time and effort to understand what had occurred, was occurring and what needed to occur in the future to help the city expand. Many see the city of Siena as bound to the limits of the city walls when there is so much possibility beyond those walls to help keep the city thriving.

Much of our mapping can be seen as our process work which was able to lead us to our proposals. A majority of our focus was centered on signage and symbols in and around the city. We became aware of any and every ‘way finding’ tactic that is used both within and outside of the walls for the different networks in use. It was through this focus we were able to see disconnects and absence among and between networks. Fixing as well as adding to make the networks and their connections became the primary focus for our final proposal.

Proposals
Our final proposal is comprised of a Directional Boundary, Networks, Primary Nodes, and Secondary Nodes. These elements can be found on our group website as well as other project images. It was important that we as group defined these elements as we saw them, which are written below:

*Directional Boundary: A layer and or elements that is understood to allow for way finding in relationship to the city
*Networks: Understood connection between two points
*Primary Node: Major Intersections that occur between networks along the directional boundary
*Secondary Node: minor intersections of multiple networks

When mapping the different signage and symbols related to the major networks we found that several of the networks were frustrated or frustrating and therefore in need of modification or recreation. Along with the additions was the creation of a directional boundary that allows users to keep in reference to the city wall. The changes made to networks were also in parallel with the creation of a multitude of primary and secondary nodes in and around the city. Many of the proposed interventions are small and most are only suggestive of what is possible for the city in the future. By beginning to integrate these changes, Siena can continue to grow while being continuously tied back to its beginnings within the wall.

Overall it is seen that this compilation of networks and nodes can be activated and occupied by both tourists and locals. Their relationship and ties to one another may not be directly understood by a user visiting the city for the day however they become a part of the system none the less. The goal for the future is that this system of networks and nodes will continue to grow outside of the city while still having a relationship back to the walls where it all began. All those encountering the city are not only drawn inside of the wall but become a part of everything occurring outside of the wall.

Performance
In order to enact the idea of nodes and networks that were a strong part of our findings we instilled a performance into our final presentation which simulated these elements. Through what we named Anti-Tourism we had our guests and critics experience our ‘city’ in the way a tourist might normally do. This experience however was in opposition to how tourists are normally lead through a city. Without a map the users navigated through the building follow arrow markers with no map to confirm where they were or even where they were going. Along the way they encountered different rooms with documentation but no information on the documentation. The guide was not giving any information but rather documenting how the user ventured through the building. Each of the users was eventually lead to a final room which held our final proposal.

Each of the four different routes that went throughout the building correlated to four of the networks found in and around Siena. Those on the blue path were following the car and therefore had the least number of stops en route to their destination. Second to this was the red route, or the bus, which had just a few more stops than the car. Thirdly was that of the green route which was simulating the bicycle. They had more stops than the bus but not as many as the orange route which was that of the pedestrian. The pedestrian was the longest and most time consuming route with the most stops before arriving at the final destination.

There was a level of confusion amongst all of the users as they were wandering through the building, which was exactly what we had intended. We as guides had experience much confusion when we we’re navigating the actual networks that exist outside of the walls of Siena. This sense of confusion and frustration was a major tool for us in our final proposal. The goal being that by connected networks and creating new ones any sense of confusion would diminish. Each of the networks would work on their own but also in relationship to one another especially upon their intersections at the various nodes.

PERFORMANCE DIRECTIONS:
1. Follow the direction markers on the floor that correspond to the color of the card in your hand
2. You will be encountering maps and documentation of Siena
3. You need to collect one map on your journey. It will be marked by a square with a star on it that corresponds to the color of your card & directional markers
4. When there are no more arrows you have come to the end

ROUTES:
Blue = Car (1 stop) Valeria Barra
Red = Bus (2 stops) Matteo Vigni
Green = Bike (3 stops) Roger Smith
Orange = Pedestrian (4 stops) Jim Dart

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This is how we map.

Aug 28 2011

Maps for Final Presentation (Who says being a code-jockey isn’t useful :] )

 

And we also have these quick summations showing the paths our professors took through the building (to get to our final presentation):

 



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Jamm Presents: The JAMM Anti-Tourism Agency

Aug 26 2011



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Proposal for the Rio Olympic Games

Aug 26 2011

Disclaimer: Not my work.

This is a really brilliant presentation of the plans for the 2016 Olympic Games. I’m not a big sports fan, but I’d love to go just to see the architecture.

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Free Water in Italy

Aug 25 2011

One of the great things about Italy is the free water. In most cities, fountains like these are scattered around in public spaces. The water runs non-stop and is delicious and cold. Plus they have these beautiful little designs that are really wonderfully functional. (These particular fountains are in Roma, right near the Colosseum)





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Jamm Goes Mapping: Crawling Through the Bushes!

Aug 25 2011

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Urban Space Analytique

Aug 24 2011



When I first visited the Pinocateca Nazionale, it struck me as being fully integrated into the urban fabric… Which is to say, not terribly monumental. It’s compositional qualities are subtle, and in my analytique I tried to suss them out and make them obvious.

The Pinocateca is composed of three parts; two masses (each with their own set of clear axis) and a “leftover” trapezoidal courtyard. The resultant quality of the courtyard is most clearly expressed in its columns. I interpreted these columns as a simple field condition, and featured their irregularity with the intention of calling attention to the mediating nature of the courtyard space; it bridges the two disparate set of axis.

Moving outward from there, I wanted to represent the public nature of the street, which is codified in two ways. First is the banki (benches) outside of the Pinocateca, and the second is the steps outside of San Pietro alle Scale.

I used the street (in plan) as an organizing element, and drew sections such that the street wall lined up in section and plan (see the drawing). This basically created a “San Pietro side” and a “Pinocateca side”, which I reinforced by adding the sculpture of Saint Peter to the former, and the Pinocateca sign to the latter.

The facades were the next element to be fit into the composition, followed by the site plan. I actually wish I had extended the site plan further. If I had drawn it butting up against the edges of the other drawings, the whole composition would probably read more holistically.

Overall though, I’m really pleased with how it came out, I am a hundred times better with watercolor now then I was a month ago, and I can see marked improvement in how I think about graphic presentation.




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